How To Pick the Right YouTube Background Music

If you’re just starting your journey in video creation, you’ve probably noticed a common thread in your favorite YouTube videos. They all use background music, and it takes their videos from good to great. 

You may have also noticed another, opposite trend: Some of the least interesting, most annoying videos on YouTube also use background music. However, this music makes their videos worse.

How can something as simple as a background song affect videos so strongly in both directions? It’s because music is tied to emotion and communication. Choosing the right song for your videos can make all the difference in how people react to them. 

If you’re ready to start adding YouTube background music to your videos, keep reading. You’ll learn how YouTubers choose their music, how you can choose the right song for your videos, and examples of good and bad videos with background music.

How Do YouTubers Choose Their Music?

Popular YouTubers can choose their music in a couple of different ways. Some people find songs they like off the radio and put them in their videos. Unfortunately, that’s illegal! These songs are covered by copyright, and without permission from the copyright holder, it’s not legal to use them. YouTube takes down or mutes videos with copyrighted music in them every day. If you’ve put a ton of effort into your videos, it would be a shame to lose them because you used a song without permission. 

The other solution is to use a YouTube background music finder. This is a tool that helps you find YouTube background music with no copyright. Songs without copyrights, or songs that are covered by special, free Creative Commons copyrights, can be used for whatever you want. By using a YouTube background music finder, YouTube stars find great songs for their videos without risking a takedown. If you’ve ever heard the same piece of popular YouTube background music in multiple videos, this is probably what the makers were doing. 

How Do I Choose the Right Background Music?

Finding the right song can seem intimidating. After all, the right background music can make or break a quality video. How do you choose music that fits your video? 

Start with an emotion you wish to communicate. Figure out exactly what you want the viewer to feel when watching your video. Pick appropriate music based on that emotion.

By getting a clear idea of what you wish the viewer to feel upfront, you’ll have clear direction on everything else you need: content, dialog, imagery, and most importantly, background music.

What Background Music Can I Use on YouTube?

As a video creator, you need to choose your music carefully. It’s best to get your music through a site that lets you license it specifically for YouTube. A site like StockMusic.net is the perfect partner. You can find royalty free music that fits what you need for your video. 

All you need to do is search the site for the emotion or genre of music you want to add. You can listen to the results and decide on the song that fits best. Once you’re subscribed, you can get all the YouTube background music downloads you need.

The Best and Worst Uses of Background Music on YouTube

Of course, every video and YouTuber is different. If you’re still wondering, “How do I choose background music for YouTube?” Some examples might help. Here are four examples of good and bad music use in different genres of YouTube videos. You can learn from these to make your own videos better.

Cooking

Cooking videos are some of the most popular on YouTube. They teach people how to make exciting new recipes. However, creating an excellent cooking video takes more than just recording yourself making food. The right background music can elevate the video from a simple instructional guide into a real show. 

A great example of a cooking video is “Slow Living in my Summer Kitchen | Relaxing Cooking Vlog,” from The Carriage House channel. This video has simple, jazzy music in the background throughout the video. The music sets the tone for the video, which is intended to be a calm, relaxing experience. 

When Bekah, the channel owner, speaks over the video, the music continues but fades into the background. That helps the music tie the whole video together without distracting from the actual cooking. 

Great examples of similar music include “Dance With Me” by the Sound Room and “Good Choice” by Dewey Dellay.

Of course, bad background music can ruin the vibe of your cooking YouTube video. The video ” CRAZY & DELICIOUS FOOD HACKS” by the channel Rethink Crafting is an example of just that. The video is an upbeat collection of quick and easy recipes without any words. It’s fast enough that you’d expect something fun to be playing in the background. Instead, the music is a weirdly sad, instrumental song. Even worse, the song abruptly starts over halfway through the video. Better songs might have been “Fluffy Trip” by Daniel J. Schmidt or “Squirrels Surf Too” by Steven Paul Glotzer. 

Beauty

‌Beauty videos are another YouTube genre that benefit from background music. When people are putting on makeup, it’s hard to talk and keep people interested. The right track will keep the audience from getting bored while learning the secrets of different application styles and product combinations. 

Vogue’s video, ” Olivia Rodrigo’s Guide to Effortless Skin-Care and Makeup,” is the perfect demonstration of this. The channel’s professional editors found a simple, rhythmic background track that adds a layer of depth to the video and makes it more than just Olivia talking to the camera. The music is just loud enough to be easily heard without making it difficult to understand her. Similar music that you could use in your own videos includes “Simple Fun” by Dewey Dellay and “Euro X-cursion” by Daniel J. Schmidt.

It’s not enough to play music quietly, of course. If the music doesn’t line up with how you want people to feel, you’re just going to confuse your audience. For example, in the video ” Makeup Tutorial” by Accusonus, the backing track is a strange rock band piece with intense guitar. It’s an odd choice for a simple tutorial about a one-minute makeup tip. Even worse, the song is almost impossible to hear.  A better choice might have been “All You Angels” by Bryan Steele.

Fitness

‌Fitness videos are a fun genre, but you need to be careful with background music. Lots of people like to listen to energetic music when they work out. If you’re going to make a YouTube video with instructions about how to work out, you should use fun, up-tempo music that will get people ready to move.

The video ” 5 Best Exercises to Flatten your Lower Belly” by the Blogilates channel finds a great balance. It uses energetic but straightforward background music that will keep people from getting bored. It’s also easy to understand the instructor over the music. Similar music you can add to your own exercise videos might be “Euphoric Trance” by Bobby Cole and “Giant” by Joel Loopez.

On the other end of the spectrum is the video ” Low impact, fat burning, cardio workout from home” by the Body Project. This video uses small clips of individual songs and changes the song every exercise. The songs have words that are difficult to understand. Both of these traits distract the watcher and make it hard to pay attention to what they’re supposed to be doing. It would be better to stick with a single instrumental song from beginning to end, like “Shew Attack Is Back” by The Sound Room.

Vlogging

Vlogging is a unique genre of videos where you record your daily life and talk to your viewers. Plenty of vloggers put up videos with no background music at all, but they don’t rake in the views like channels with the right music. 

The YouTuber Hannah Elise uses background music better than most. Her videos, like ” a PRODUCTIVE day in my life,” use background music and sound effects throughout, and it makes an impact. Instead of a boring rant, her videos are engaging and fun to watch. The music makes the video that much better. Hannah also uses several songs, so the video has an emotional arc. You can use music like “Smart Cool Urban” by Botabateau and “Polygons” by Joel Loopez to get a similar effect in your own vlogs. 

Make Your Videos Better with Music

Music speaks to people, and adding it to your videos will take them to the next level. Don’t risk losing your videos to a takedown by trying to use copyrighted music, either. If you’re ready to make your YouTube videos that much better, get your royalty-free, licensed music today with StockMusic.net. Whether you need chill jazz, electronic beats, or high-energy rock, you can find the perfect track for your next masterpiece. 

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